Media Recognition

December 2017

Dr. Levy was quoted in Feature Article: Not Your Great-Grandfather's Psychoanalysis and How Psychoanalysis got a Bad Rap in the APA Monitor.

October 2017

Dr. Levy was featured in the Q&A panel about Borderline Personality Disorder during the screening of the movie "Borderline"

September 2017

Dr. Levy was quoted in an article on Narcissism and Narcissistic Personality Disorder on Kinfolk Magazine

February 2017

Dr. Levy was featured in an article about people with Borderline Personality Disorder on Centered.

Dr. Levy's publication was cited in an article about Narcissistic Personality Disorder on Psychology Today

January 2017

Dr. Levy was quoted in SundayReview on Attachment Theory.

Dr. Levy was quoted in Nostrofiglio on Attachment Theory.

December 2016

Dr. Levy appeared on the DrDrew Podcasts, discussing Borderline Personality Disorder.

Dr. Levy quoted in the International Business Times about Borderline Personality Disorder.

December 2015

Lab research was featured in VICE.

Dr. Levy's research at the Weill Cornell Medical Center was featured in Science Daily.

April 2015

Lab research was featured in Psychology Today.

March 2015

Lab research was featured in Psychology Today.

December 2014

Dr. Levy was featured in a Q&A by the Carlat Report about Transference-Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder.

November 2014

Dr. Levy was mentioned in an article about narcissism in relates to social media on Illawarra Mercury.

November 2011

Dr. Levy was featured in an article about the cause and impact of sexual abuse on Centre Daily Times.

September 2011

Lab research was featured in Huffington Post.

October 2010

Lab research was featured in Scientific American.

August 2010

The New York Times Our Family and its Legacy of Pain.

January 2010

Lab research was featured in Newsweek.

March 2009

Psychiatrist Awarded for Research on Psychoanalytic Therapy
Article by Joan Arehart-Treichel in Psychiatric News.

May 2008

Dr. Levy published an editorial in the American Journal of Psychiatry called Psychotherapies and Lasting Change

February 2008

A reviewer comment published in Journal Watch Psychiatry, February 4, 2008

The Brain in Borderline Personality Disorder

Does impaired prefrontal inhibition lead to the diminished emotional self-regulation characteristic of this disorder? Borderline personality disorder, characterized by preponderantly negative affective states, high reactivity, and diminished ability to regulate one's emotions, has challenged researchers for decades. Previous neuropsychological studies have suggested that impulsivity and negative affectivity may be related to orbitofrontal dysfunction. Now, neurobiological and psychoanalytic investigators join in an elegant examination of the hypothesis that during negative emotional states, patients with borderline personality disorder would show deficient inhibitory function of the prefrontal cortex. Sixteen patients with borderline personality disorder and 14 healthy controls were subjected to a test requiring motor inhibition during negative emotion. No patients had current substance dependence, but many had past or current psychiatric comorbidities.

Subjects underwent functional MRI scanning while silently reading a series of negative, positive, or neutral words; they were asked to press a button while reading each word but to inhibit pressing it when the word was italicized. When confronted with negative stimuli and asked to exert behavioral inhibition, patients showed less activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the posterior medial orbitofrontal cortex than controls did, and more activity in the left and right extended amygdala and ventral striatum. The brain-activation pattern differences persisted in all analyses that adjusted for psychiatric comorbidities and psychotropic drug use (by 11 patients) — except in an analysis for avoidant personality disorder.

Comment

Although these findings require replication, this neurobiological evidence of different activations in regions of both the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala is consistent with borderline personality disorder's most prominent clinical features. Could these findings lead to more specific pharmacologic interventions? — Joel Yager, MD

Citation(s)

Silbersweig D et al. (2007). Failure of frontolimbic inhibitory function in the context of negative emotion in borderline personality disorder. Am J Psychiatry 2007 Dec; 164:1832. September 2007: Harvard Mental Health Letter on Victories over borderline personality disorder June 2007: Dr. Levy's research was cited in the article Do all roads lead to Rome? New findings on Borderline Personality Disorder.

December 2007

Dr. Levy's research at the Weill Cornell Medical Center was featured in Science Daily.

March 2007

Dr. Frank Yeomans appeared again on The Positive Mind radio show, discussing narcissism. Click Here for a copy of the program.

January 2007

Dr. Frank Yeomans appeared on The Positive Mind radio show, discussing borderline personality disorder. Click Here for a copy of the program.

Dr. Frank Yeomans also appeared on WNYC's The Leonard Lopate Show. Click Here for a copy of the program.

Dr. Frank Yeomans also appeared on The Today Show Weekend Edition January 27th. Click Here for more information about the program.

July 2006

Harvard Mental Health Letter on Borderline Personality Disorder.